Amazon asking for REACH Declaration

Hello everyone,

I sell stainless steel jewelry in Europe and have my products listed on Amazon. Now they ask me for a REACH declaration, which I don’t have. It is not make of some chemicals, so how can I solve this problem?

If I select the Apeal request, what should I do?

Thanks for your comments in advance.

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Stainless steel is generally REACH compliant. However, there are some types of stainless steel that contain nickel, which is a Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC) under REACH. If your stainless steel jewelry contains nickel, you will need to provide a REACH declaration that shows the nickel content is below the REACH threshold.

You can either self-certify your REACH compliance or have a third-party testing company do it for you. If you self-certify, you will need to complete a REACH declaration form and keep records of your testing and documentation. If you have a third-party testing company do it for you, they will provide you with a REACH certificate of conformity.

If you don’t have a REACH declaration, you can appeal Amazon’s decision. To do this, you will need to provide Amazon with evidence that your stainless steel jewelry is REACH compliant. This evidence could include a REACH declaration from your supplier, test results from a third-party testing company, or a letter from a qualified expert.

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I am sorry to hear that you are experiencing issues with Amazon asking for a REACH Declaration. Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do at this point.

Amazon’s REACH requirements were a very big topic back in 2020 and literally sabotaged thousands of businesses.

Amazon Europe now requires sellers to submit a REACH Declaration containing expensive laboratory tests proving that jewelry doesn’t contain harmful chemicals for each ASIN.

This means that those selling thousands of ASINs of cheap generic Chinese jewelry had their businesses shut down overnight.

My recommendation is that you pick the most popular ASINs and arrange to have the laboratory tests performed (they typically cost around $500 per ASIN), the remaining ones will be suppressed by Amazon.

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